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NORTH WALES LEVERAGES UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE AS A KEY TOURISM ASSET

North Wales Tourism says the awarding of UNESCO World Heritage Status to the slate landscape of the region will provide a big economic boost for many years to come.

Jim Jones, the Chief Executive of North Wales Tourism, says he is thrilled that news of the global recognition has been confirmed. North Wales now has more UNESCO World Heritage Sites per square mile than anywhere else in the world.

“This global accolade is brilliant news for North Wales, especially the slate industry of North West Wales and will provide many economic benefits for many years to come. This is fantastic recognition for our heritage, celebrating the magnificent and breath taking historic landscapes,” said Mr Jones.

NORTH WALES LEVERAGES UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE AS A KEY TOURISM ASSET
A boat passing the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct (the highest in the world) near Llangollen in Wales

UNESCO World Heritage Sites in North Wales include the castles of King Edward I, and the Poncysyllte Aqueduct near Llangollen.

The area rose to prominence as a supplier of slate in the 18th Century as a result of the industrial revolution. It served international demand for Welsh slate between 1780 and 1940, with Gwynedd also home to major developments in quarrying and stone processing.

Among the buildings roofed with Welsh slate are London’s Houses of Parliament, the Royal Exhibition Building in Melbourne, Australia, and Copenhagen city hall in Denmark. In 1830, half the buildings in New York had roofs made of Welsh slate.

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